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  • Food & Fun

    The art of aperitif

    02 December 2015

    FROM a tete-a-tete, to family dinners, whether at home or a local restaurant: for the French, the aperitif is basically considered a ritual, wherever and whatever the occasion. The Romans embraced the aperitif, adding honey to wine before meals but the word dates as far back as the Middle Ages and derives from the Latin word aperire, meaning “to open”.

    Said to tickle the digestive system, the selection of dry or sweet drinks includes vermouth, gin, champagne, dry sherry, and fortified wine.

    A particular favourite the world over includes the French made Lillet, a blend of wines – it can be white or red varietals, but only from Bordeaux, with touches of orange and green apple.

    From around 1888, aperitif became a common noun and these days, we prefer to think of it as a civilizing libation, a sophisticated mood-setter for ‘thinker drinkers’ and bon vivants.