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  • Musique

    Parcels, The Byron Bay Locals who are making wave in France

    By ANNABEL ROSS 21 August 2018
    Image – David Goltz

     If you haven’t already heard of Parcels, chances are you soon will. The Byron Bay pop band moved to Berlin in early 2015 and in the couple of years since have signed with major French label Kitsune, released a well-received debut EP, Hideout, had a track produced by Daft Punk, performed on Conan O’Brien’s late night talk show, and toured all over Europe including supporting Phoenix in October this year. Yep, it’s fair to say big things are in store for the five-piece – we suggest you catch them while you can on their homecoming tour next January.

    We chatted with Anatole “Toto” Serret (drums) about living in Berlin, touring in Europe and why the band is so popular in France…

     

    What’s it been like being on the road with Phoenix?
    They’re such an inspiring band and crew to be around, definitely more so than some than other shows and support gigs we’ve done. We’ve been inspired by them since we started playing music, really. A nice plus is that there are beds on the tour bus, too. It beats sleeping on the bus in between shows then getting up and driving for 12 hours. It’s been pretty luxurious, really!

     

    Have you been surprised by the reaction you’ve had in France?
    Our music often gets referred to as having a “European” sound, and the more European music I listen to, the more I get it. I definitely think of Parcels as a European project rather than an Australian one. As for France in particular, I feel like they pay a lot of attention to up and coming artists and there is such a thriving music scene in France today, maybe they are just more aware? Plus the Kitsune crew have been great, they’re a small but close group of people who have really become a part of the Parcels family.

     

    What is the biggest French crowd you’ve played to?
    There were two shows just a couple of weeks between each other, We Love Green festival in Paris and Belfort’s Les Eurockéennes and both of them were totally insane. All I can say is I cannot wait for next summer.

     Which French artists are you most influenced by?
    Joseph-Maurice Ravel, Claude Achille Debussy and Gabriel Faure are some classics.


    How do French crowds compare with Australian crowds?
    The dress code is totally different, the intoxication levels are incomparable, (although maybe the French are just better at standing straight), but I have a feeling they both enjoy the show equally.

     

    When you write music now, are you keeping your European audiences in mind?
    I think it’s best to have no audience in mind when writing music. In saying that, it’s a tough thing to do.

     

    Do any of you speak French?
    As a matter of fact my father is French, but apart from “Mon Papa est francais” I struggle to piece together another sentence.

     

    Do you see yourselves moving to France at some point, or staying in Berlin for the time being?
    Berlin…for the time being. Our music clicks with Paris a lot more but Berlin suits our living situation in terms of travelling and touring. We love it there, too.

     

    Biggest differences between Australian culture and European culture that you’ve noticed? How has being in Europe influenced your fashion?
    There are many differences, the major influence on our fashion is the sense of liberation you get being in Europe. There are really no boundaries as to what you “should” wear, man or woman, and in Berlin especially I feel like it’s almost encouraged to step outside of your comfort zone. When I was back in Australia in December last year, it hit me that it’s really not like that at home in terms of this liberation.

     

    Who are some of your favourite artists currently
    Winter [in Europe] is here, Game of Thrones reference unintended, and with the onset of the cold, the tempo drops, the mood softens and I start searching for something to wake me up slower than the usual summer hit. This month it’s the Chet Baker album – Chet Baker Sings. I might be about 60 years too late, but who’s countin’.